College Admissions

Juniors and Seniors: Making Summer Productive

Juniors and Seniors: Making Summer Productive

As the temperatures rise and students begin to look forward to exciting summer plans, I want to remind all of them to remain focused and finish the school year strong. As the end to the school year approaches, so do AP exams and finals and I encourage students to apply themselves and to stay focused so that their grades do not suffer.  For rising seniors, this is especially important because many college applications deadlines fall in November and December so Fall Semester grades will not be included in your applications.  Below are a few more notes for juniors and seniors.

A Case of Varsity Blues

A Case of Varsity Blues

As you are aware by now, the FBI has uncovered a $25 million operation where wealthy parents have paid for their children to cheat their way into some of the “best” colleges in the country. Actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin are just some of the people named in this scandal.

Now higher education institutions are under pressure to take a close look at the many students who received unfair advantage, as well as their own admissions practices. USC just announced that students involved in the admissions scandal are prevented from registering for classes and getting transcripts until the investigation is completed. Some other universities affected by the scheme (UCLA, University of Texas at Austin and Wake Forest University) are either planning to take no action or still investigating.

SAT vs. ACT: Which Test Is Best for You?

SAT vs. ACT: Which Test Is Best for You?

Since both the SAT and ACT are acceptable for colleges, how do you decide which take to take? The tests are a bit different, and some students might do better on one than the other, depending on the student’s thinking style, academic knowledge, time management, and test-taking savviness. So how do you find out which test is best test for your student? You expose and test them on both tests’ formats, then compare the results and discover if one is more favorable for your child.  

How can we expose students to both formats? Here are some options:

The PSAT/NMSQT Test: Why It Matters

The PSAT/NMSQT Test: Why It Matters

When it comes to prepping for the SAT, most students and parents view the PSAT, or Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, as a simple test-run of moderate importance. However, the PSAT—and your student’s results—wields more influence than you might realize. Though available to students in both their sophomore and junior years, the stakes get higher during 11th grade, when PSAT results hold weight.

Here are a few key ways in which the PSAT goes beyond its role as a simple “practice” test.

Is Self-Study a Good Fit for Your Student?

Is Self-Study a Good Fit for Your Student?

When striving for success on college applications, schoolwork, or the SAT/ACT, wisdom dictates that students and their families have a plan of attack. Perhaps the first go-to method in preparing for a test is the solo route: a student and a textbook, a few long hours of disciplined study, and hopefully some positive scores result. Additionally, the rise of online study tools has driven students even closer to the computer screen. But, since each student is both unique and complex—complete with particular strengths and weaknesses, goals, and learning styles—isn’t it prudent to consider if there’s a study method that better serves your student? 

Why does the PSAT/NMSQT Test Matters?

When it comes to prepping for the SAT, most students and parents view the PSAT, or Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, as a simple test-run of moderate importance. However, the PSAT—and your student’s results—wields more influence than you might realize.